Spaghetti Western Double Feature: Boot Hill / Django The Bastard (DVD Review)

Spaghetti Western Double Feature: Boot Hill / Django The Bastard (DVD Review)
Rated: UR/Region O/Number of Discs 1
Available from RetroVision Entertainment

Boot Hill (1969)
Directed By: Giuseppe Colizzi
Starring: Terence Hill, Bud Spencer, Woody Strode
Widescreen

Honey Fisher has become a powerful man in this small Western town that has grown up around gold-prospecting fields. Fisher and his gang have managed, through swindling, murder, and terror, to gain leases on the important gold-yielding land in the area. A state commissioner comes to town to review the leases, which are crucial to Fisher’s power. Cat Stevens and Hutch Bessy join forces with circus performers and townsfolk led by Stevens’ friend Finch to fight against Fisher and his henchmen.

This movie is one of a trilogy of Spaghetti Westerns that also feature God Forgives… I Don’t! and Ace High. This one takes the action to the circus and has a group of people from the circus join our hero after they themselves help him early on and it brings the bad guys to them and they kill one of circus folks. I give all the credit in the world to someone fro adding another element to the Spaghetti Western genre and it does come with some cool characters and acting performances. I just feel some stuff gets lost a little along the way and it doesn’t hold up as well now as it probably once did. I dig the performance of both Terence Hill as Cat Stevens and Woody Strode as Thomas. One minute Thomas is flipping around the hire wire without a next and the next he’s shooting down the bad guys along with Cat. Those two together are probably the best this one has to offer, but not much else after that. It can get a little too dull for its own good from time to time.

Extras

– English and Italian Language
– Italian Credits
– Photo Slideshow

 

 

 

Django the Bastard (1969)
Directed By: Sergio Garrone
Starring: Anthony Steffen, Paolo Gozlino, Luciano Rossi
Widescreen

A mysterious, vengeful stranger rides into town and creates all sorts of havoc. It seems there are a number of people on his list and before he metes out justice to each one, he places a cross with that person’s name on it in the middle of the street. The burning question becomes whether these people are dealing with a one-man army of flesh and blood or an avenging angel of death.

Django the Bastard is another in the long line of Italian films that just tossed Django on the title in order to try to cash in on the success of Sergio Corbucci’s film Django. This time around our Django may be a human or he may be a ghost. That is the question we ask and the bad guys in the film ask as Django rolls in and out of scenes like a ninja and for the most part very easily pick off the bad guys. As the film moves along we see some backstory and see that everyone he’s targeting took part in some shady business once upon a time and that is why Django is back (from the dead?) to seek vengeance! Now, is he really dead or alive? I’ll leave that for you to watch and see for yourself but I will say that I enjoyed the more gothic and eerie mood this Django film gives off. There is a spooky tone here that I sure do appreciate and I think it oddly enough mixes in well with the normal stuff you get with Italian Spaghetti Westerns of the time. Plus, it is always nice to see something that was the motivation for Clint Eastwood’s “High Plains Drifter”.

Extras

– English and Italian Language
– Alternative Credits
– Photo Slideshow

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