Four Classic German Silent Films Now Available on Blu-ray & DVD from Kino Classics

Four Classic German Silent Films Now Available on Blu-ray & DVD from Kino Classics

Four Classic German Silent Films Now Available on Blu-ray & DVD from Kino Classics

0 comments 📅28 April 2020, 22:57
Kino Classics ReleasesFour Classic German Silent FilmsAvailable on Blu-ray & DVD
Four Acclaimed Masterworks of German Silent Cinema The Great Leap (1927) starring Leni Riefenstahl, Paul Wegener’s The Golem (1920), G.W. Pabst’s The Love of Jeanne Ney (1927), and F.W. Murnau’s Tartuffe (1925)Presented in Restorations by the F.W. Murnau-Stiftung


New York, NY — April 28, 2020 — Kino Classics is proud to announce the Blu-ray and DVD releases of four German classics of the silent era, presented in restorations by the F.W. Murnau-Stiftung: The Great Leap (1927), directed by Arnold Fanck and starring Leni Riefenstahl, Paul Wegener’s The Golem (1920), G.W. Pabst’s The Love of Jeanne Ney (1927), and F.W. Murnau’s Tartuffe (1925), starring Emil Jannings.

The Great Leap, released on April 7, features audio commentary by film historian Samm Deighan. The Golem, released April 14, contains both a 4K restoration of the German release version with three musical scores (music scores by Stephen Horne, Admir Shkurtaj, and Lukasz “Wudec” Poleszak), and the U.S. release version (with music by Cordula Heth), along with a comparison between the German and U.S. versions, and audio commentary by film historian Tim Lucas. The Love of Jeanne Ney, available April 21, presents both the restored German release version with music arranged and orchestrated by Bernd Thewes, and the U.S. release version with music by Andrew Earle Simpson, and includes audio commentary by film historian Eddy von Mueller. Tartuffe will be released on April 28, and includes both the German release version with a new score by Robert Israel, and the U.S. release version with music by Giuseppe Becce, adapted by Javier Perez de Azpeita.

The Great Leap (1927)
Before she became a celebrated documentarian (and notorious public figure), Leni Riefenstahl was a popular actress, best known for her “mountain films” made by director Arnold Fanck. The Holy Mountain (Der heilige Berg, 1926) and The White Hell of Pitz Palu (Die weisse Hölle vom Piz Palü, 1929) were awe-inspiring dramas of romance and survival, but her 1927 film The Great Leap (Der große Sprung) was something surprisingly different: a playful romantic comedy set high atop the Dolomotes. Riefenstahl plays an Italian peasant whose simple life is upended when a series of urbanites invade the slopes for a ski vacation. This bubbly comedy (featuring Riefenstahl’s usual on-screen love interest, Luis Trenker) combines slapstick laughs with stunning footage of acrobatic skiing and rock climbing, making it perhaps the most entertaining (if unconventional) entry in the cycle of German mountain films.

The Golem (1920)
Widely recognized as the source of the Frankenstein myth, the ancient Hebrew legend of the Golem provided actor/director Paul Wegener with the substance for one of the most adventurous films of the German silent cinema. Suffering under the tyrannical rule of Rudolf II in 16th-century Prague, a Talmudic rabbi (Albert Steinruck) creates a giant warrior (Paul Wegener) to protect the safety of his people. When the rabbi’s assistant (Ernst Deutsch) takes control of the Golem and attempts to use him for selfish gain, the lumbering monster runs rampant, abducting the rabbi’s daughter (Lyda Salmonova) and setting fire to the ghetto. With its remarkable creation sequence (a dazzling blend of religion, sorcery and special effects) and the grand-scale destruction of its climax, The Golem was one of the greatest achievements of the legendary UFA Studios, and remains an undeniable landmark in the evolution of the horror film.
The Love of Jeanne Ney (1927)An epic of the Weimar cinema, The Love of Jeanne Ney follows a young French woman’s struggle for happiness amid the political turbulence and corruption of post-World War I Europe. A tour-de-force for director G.W. Pabst (Diary of a Lost GirlPandora’s Box), the film blends a variety of cinematic approaches as it weaves its complex narrative of moral chaos and political upheaval: the “American Style,” evocative of the Hollywood studio blockbuster; the avant-garde techniques of Soviet montage; as well as the eerie moving camerawork and shadowy perspectives typical of German Expressionism. The result is a stunning cinematic experiment that never fails to surprise the viewer as it races towards its exhilarting conclusion.

Tartuffe (1925)The most gifted visual storyteller of the German silent era, F. W. Murnau crafted works of great subtlety and emotional complexity through his absolute command of the cinematic medium. Known for such dazzling films as Nosferatu (1922), The Last Laugh (1924), Faust (1926), and Sunrise (1927), Murnau was also drawn to more intimate dramas exploring the dark corners of the human mind.

In Tartuffe, he revisits Moliére’s fable of religious hypocrisy, in which a faithful wife (Lil Dagover) tries to convince her husband (Werner Krauss) that their morally superior guest, Tartuffe (Emil Jannings), is in fact a lecherous hypocrite with a taste for the grape. To endow the story with contemporary relevance, Murnau frames Moliére’s tale with a modern-day plot concerning a housekeeper’s stealthy efforts to poison her elderly master and take control of his estate.

The Great LeapDirector: Arnold FanckStarring Leni Riefenstahl and Luis Trenker
Blu-ray SRP: $29.95DVD SRP: $19.95
1927 | Germany | B&W | 111 mins. | Not Rated | 1920x1080p (1.33:1) | German intertitles with optional English subtitles
Special Features:Audio commentary by film historian Samm Deighan

The GolemWritten, Directed by and Starring Paul Wegener
Blu-ray SRP: $29.95DVD SRP: $19.95
1920 | Germany | Color-Tinted | 76 mins. | Not Rated  | 1920x1080p (1.33:1) |German intertitles with optional English subtitles
Special Features:4K restoration of German release version
music by Stephen Horne
music by Admir Shkurtai
music by Lukasz “Wudec” Poleszak

Audio commentary by film historian Tim Lucas

Comparison of German and U.S. release versions

U.S. release version, with music by Cordula Heth

The Love of Jeanne NeyDirector: G.W. PabstStarring Edith Jehanne, Fritz Rasp, Brigitte Helm, Uno Henning
Blu-ray SRP: $29.95DVD SRP: $19.95
1927 | Germany | B&W | 106 mins. | Not Rated | 1920x1080p (1.33:1) | German intertitles with optional English subtitles
Special Features:Audio commentary by film historian Eddy von Mueller

Restored German release version with music adapted and orchestrated by Bernd Thewes

U.S. release version with music by Andrew Earle Simpson
TartuffeDirector: F.W. MurnauStarring Emil Jannings
Blu-ray SRP: $29.95DVD SRP: $19.95
1925 | Germany | Color Tinted | Not Rated | 1920x1080p (1.33:1) |German intertitles with optional English subtitles
German release version: 70 min.U.S. release version: 64 min.
Special Features:Audio commentary by film historian Troy Howarth

Restored German release version with orchestral score by Robert Israel

U.S. release version with music by Giuseppe Becce, adapted by Javier Perez De Azpeitia
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